Ship Graveyards: Abandoned Ships, Boats and Shipyards

Ships and boats are ancient inventions whose rise parallels the spirit of human adventure.  From antiquity to modernity great powers have relied on shipping to expand empires, while grand liners transported tourists to far flung places previously only accessible to the imagination.  But the rise of air travel and decline of shipbuilding have left coasts and rivers littered with abandoned ships, boats and shipyards, that may not look pretty but provide a fascinating retrospective subject for photographers and maritime enthusiasts.

(Images: Bob Jagendorf, cc-nc-3.0; alienwatch, cc-nc-nd-3.0; Ahmed Rabea, cc-sa-3.0)

While stricken ships and boats are usually salvaged for scrap, and abandoned docks and shipyards eventually repurposed, the process can take years.  Meanwhile, rusting ships and decaying infrastructure litter coastlines and river banks, their mighty hulks a sign of industrial decline in many countries.  (The above ships include SS United States and TSS Duke of Lancaster – full feature.)

 

Around the web

  • Sonia Adam Murray

    Interesting work, thank you for sharing.

  • Mike

    Photos would be better without the lame HDR…..as if the content isn’t interesting enough to being with.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DBGA4JV35P25BO6THTWPQFW4SQ Michael

    All these pictures are interesting,a few are beautiful in their own right, but mainly and sadly I see a whole lot of waste and even worse a lot of polution. Why isn’t there any salvaging going on while cleaning up at the same time. I know many wrecks can serve as artificial reefs, but they need to be clean, and the above water salvaging should be even easier.  It just seems there’s a lot money to be made while doing something good for the enviorment

  • Roger Weston

    You write, “like
    disused fishing boats lying near the sea – have a wistful quality that harks
    back to an earlier time.”  Your comments show insight into the soul of a sailor.  While living and working at sea, I often wondered about the men and women who’d been on the ship before me.  I wondered what their voyages were like.  I wondered about the dramas that unfolded on those voyages–the fights, the storms, the tragedies, and the humor. 

  • Roger Weston

    You write, “like
    disused fishing boats lying near the sea – have a wistful quality that harks
    back to an earlier time.”  Your comments show insight into the soul of a sailor.  While living and working at sea, I often wondered about the men and women who’d been on the ship before me.  I wondered what their voyages were like.  I wondered about the dramas that unfolded on those voyages–the fights, the storms, the tragedies, and the humor. 

  • Axl

    cool boats dude

  • Doug Wallworth

    Brilliant information, any chance of a write up on each individual ship . the different stories would be fantastic reading.

  • garthpool

    A most excellent work. A gem of the internet, or any other place.

  • Niamhconorie

    Shipping industry is more than this as shown here. They are now our part of life style as our economy depends on them. For more information have a look to it AA Economy Freight – shipping ireland

  • Spark and Echo Arts

    THought you might enjoy this beautiful romp through an abandoned shipyard in Staten Island: https://vimeo.com/68612633#

 
 
 
 
 
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